What Has the Law to Do With a Wedding Invitations List?

One Saturday afternoon I brought my 17-year old nephew to my solicitor’s office. We were attending a wedding dinner that night. I ushered him into my chamber, and he found himself surrounded by voluminous law books, law periodicals and law reports. He cast an amazed look at the amount of papers piling up on my desk – all requiring my urgent and immediate attention. I also had several large cards laying haphazardly on the desk – wedding invitations.

My nephew, who was interested in a career in law, took a book titled ‘Family Law’ and began reading it. Meanwhile I continued my work of drafting a statement of defence to a plaintiff’s statement of claim, preparing an affidavit in reply at the same time. I also looked at some files of divorce cases which were scheduled for hearing at the High Court next month.

After reading for about 20 minutes or so, my nephew stood up and posed me a question: “Uncle, is there a relationship between whom one invites to his wedding and the law?”

“The simple answer to that question is, no, there isn’t. Whom do you invite is not governed by any law, of course. There would be legal chaos if there be a law governing how many guests one could include in one’s wedding invitations. But there may be relationship between whom one invites to one’s wedding and the state of one’s later married life, albeit a fortuitous one. Why do you ask?”

He shrugged, and said,” No particular reason. Just ask for the sake of asking.”

“OK, but you must avoid asking such questions in the future. If you are interested in the law, you are of course encouraged to ask questions – and good questions only. For example, you might want to ask why, in the first place, there are laws governing marriages and divorce.”

His curiosity piqued, my nephew was all ears, as I continued: “In the first place, do you know that a marriage is a contract? That means it entails contractual obligations on the part of the two parties to the marriage, and that’s why there are marriage and divorce laws and regulations.”

“Oh,” came my nephew’s answer, “I didn’t know that. It sounds rather unromantic that a marriage is a contract.” How true.

We spent the rest of the afternoon in my chamber. After my personal introduction to contract law, my nephew became quite interested in the law of contract. I handed him my Guest’s Law of Contract and he began to read it.

That evening, as we mingled with the guests who made the list on the wedding invitations, I couldn’t help reflecting on the question my nephew asked of me in the office earlier. Of course, a marriage (which is always lauded as being made in heaven) is a romantic affair, an occasion for joy and cause for celebration. Who would like to be told that, in the eyes of the law, a marriage, properly formalized, becomes a contract just as much as an ordinary, cold agreement comes into force after all the terms and conditions are fulfilled? Which couple would seek the solicitor’s legal advice on marriage while they are busy preparing the wedding invitations, wedding cakes, wedding reception and the associated paraphernalia? Of course that would be the last thing on their mind.

Sorting Through The Lawyers To Get The Best Of The Best

Lawyers are able to be a savior when a person needs it the most. This is due to many times a person will in one way or another. These cases are many times a very hard thing for a person to deal with. These people need to be able to feel comfortable that their case will be dealt with and that they will get the results tat they are seeking out.

The type of lawyer that you need, will be an important aspect that you need to make sure that you consider the type of lawyer that you need for the case that you are currently facing. It is a good lawyer that will be able to give a person the piece of mind in knowing that their case is being dealt with by a professional. This can be of great relief to a person.

There are several different types of lawyers that are able to be hired to handle a wide range of problems for a person. Depending on the severity and type of case will depend on what the person will need to hire. These are a few of the types to keep in mind.

A civil case will need a professional that can handle the appropriate type of case that you are looking at. There are plenty of these to choose from and it will solely depend on what you are looking for that will make all the difference in your case. Research your options carefully to get the best possible results.

Auto accidents are able to be a welcome relief when it comes to having a tough and competent lawyer that is in their corner. There are a great many number of lawyers that are located all over the area. All you need to make sure that you do is to research the number that there is to choose from and you will need to make sure that you get the one that will give you the best possible results.

Divorce lawyers are able to be located on a regular basis to assist a person I the way of getting the best possible results from their case. It is a nasty thing having to go through a divorce and all that a person really wants, is for the case to be over and get on with their life after the divorce.

Personal injury lawyers are the final category of attorney that you need to seriously take a look at, this is one of the most commonly used representation that is able to be had in a time of a person being injured. In many cases the lawyer will take no fee unless he wins your case for you.

Lawyers are a wonderful thing for a person to look into for their needs after an accident or to win a particular case. It will be the person in questions decision to choose which one is the best one for you to use for your efforts, good luck in your particular case.

Choosing the Best Lawyer for Your Small Business

If you own a small business, it is important to choose the best lawyer to represent the interests of your small business. A strategic business lawyer can help you with your start-up and ongoing strategies, help you with critical business planning, review leases and contracts, and negotiate for you. Your attorney must help you comply with a myriad of regulations from employment issues to zoning.

You must research carefully to find just the right legal expert. You do not want a lawyer who does not take an interest in or learn about your business. You can ask accountants, bankers, other small-business owners, and friends for referrals. You can check with your state Bar association to find out if they have attorneys who specialize in representing small businesses. You can ask for and check the lawyer’s references. You can also look in the Martindale-Hubbell Law Directory.

You should not make your final decision based on referrals or other sources. You must interview the lawyers that you believe would suit your business. You should be aware that many attorneys charge a consultation fee of $150 or more. That is a small amount to pay to be sure that the lawyer you choose can meet your needs and will really do a job representing your business.

The following are a few points to keep in mind when you interview the attorney. First, be sure that the lawyer does not rush through the interview and gives you his or her full, undivided attention. Be sure that the lawyer you choose understands your business and your industry including its processes. The lawyer you choose must be willing to take as much time as needed to explain every legal issue that may arise and its consequences. Finally, the lawyer must be available to you whenever you need help, and it is not acceptable for the lawyer to turn you over to the legal assistant after your retainer is paid.

There may be other things that are important to you, and you should not hesitate to demand the type and quality of service that you deserve.

Copyright 2006. Indigo Business Solutions is a registered trade name.

Court Reporter Firms – A Most Valuable Resource For Small Law Firms

It would seem that law firms would have no problem hiring the best court reporters. But that’s often not the case, especially for smaller law firms that don’t have a human resources department. Although smaller firms know what they want in a reporter, finding the time and resources to determine whether a reporter meets their qualifications can prove difficult, and usually results in their using one of two methods to find the right reporters: seeking professional references from other law firms that require litigation services, or seeking reporters through the aid of court reporter firms. While professional referrals can be helpful to finding top rate reporters, seeking a reporter through court reporter firms is usually the better option for two reasons: many reporting firms offer additional litigation services associated with court reporting, and contacting a reporting firm is the best way to choose from the largest number of qualified candidates.

In some cases, court reporter firms that offer additional legal services are contacted to secure these services alone. But the most common reasons that law firms turn to reporting firms is for assistance with depositions reporting, which begins with hiring the right reporter for a company’s type of depositions. In terms of deposition type, the first selection criterion is whether a law firm conducts video or non-video depositions. In today’s legal scene, the assumption that a reporter has experience in video depositions is automatic. But insuring that the experience exists through a reporting agency is the safest bet. The next selection criterion is whether a reporter has experience with a law firm’s case area. For example, a health law firm would be wise to hire a reporter that has training and experience in medical terminology. The third selection criterion is what type of reporting technology is desired, such as digital reporting, voice writing, real time reporting, etc.

The three selection criteria mentioned above are the basic building blocks for choosing the right court reporter. But there’s also a fourth selection criterion that isn’t as straightforward as the rest: determining whether a reporter has the right personality. From a distance, a court reporter’s personality would seem to be one of the last things that determined his or her court reporting ability, as a reporter’s job doesn’t involve interacting with attorneys or deponents during the reporting process. However, there are various instances of poor transcript quality and even emotional reactions from reporters due their previously unnoticed personality flaws. While the majority of reporters are professional enough to handle circumstantial feelings of boredom, bias, unexpected anger, etc., some reporters aren’t as adaptable. To avoid such reporters, reputable court reporter firms evaluate their candidates’ personality in addition to their credentials and work experience.

Consumer Law Report Blasts For-Profit Colleges for Private-Label Student Loans

A new report issued in January by the National Consumer Law Center accuses for-profit colleges of saddling their students with unregulated private-label student loans that force these students into high interest rates, excessive debt, and predatory lending terms that make it difficult for these students to succeed.

The report, entitled “Piling It On: The Growth of Proprietary School Loans and the Consequences for Students,” discusses the boom over the past three years in private student loan programs offered directly by schools rather than by third-party lenders. These institutional loans are offered by so-called “proprietary schools” – for-profit colleges, career schools, and vocational training programs.

Federal vs. Private Education Loans

Most loans for students will be one of two types: government-funded federal student loans, guaranteed and overseen by the U.S. Department of Education; or non-federal private student loans, issued by banks, credit unions, and other private-sector lenders. (Some students may also be able to take advantage of state-funded college loans available in some states for resident students.)

Private student loans, unlike federal undergraduate loans, are credit-based loans, requiring the student borrower to have adequate credit history and income, or else a creditworthy co-signer.

The Beginnings of Proprietary School Loans

Following the financial crisis in 2008 that was spurred, in part, by the lax lending practices that drove the subprime mortgage boom, lenders across all industries instituted more stringent credit requirements for private consumer loans and lines of credit.

Many private student loan companies stopped offering their loans to students who attend for-profit colleges, as these students have historically had weaker credit profiles and higher default rates than students at nonprofit colleges and universities.

These moves made it difficult for proprietary schools to comply with federal financial aid regulations that require colleges and universities to receive at least 10 percent of their revenue from sources other than federal student aid.

To compensate for the withdrawal of private student loan companies from their campuses, some for-profit colleges began to offer proprietary school loans to their students. Proprietary school loans are essentially private-label student loans, issued and funded by the school itself rather than by a third-party lender.

Proprietary Loans as Default Traps

The NCLC report charges that these proprietary school loans contain predatory lending terms, charge high interest rates and large loan origination fees, and have low underwriting standards, which allow students with poor credit histories and insufficient income to borrow significant sums of money that they’re in little position to be able to repay.

In addition, these proprietary loans often require students to make payments while they’re still in school, and the loans can carry very sensitive default provisions. A single late payment can result in a loan default, along with the student’s expulsion from the academic program. Several for-profit schools will withhold transcripts from borrowers whose proprietary loans are in default, making it nearly impossible for these students to resume their studies elsewhere without starting over.

The NCLC report notes that more than half of proprietary college loans go into default and are never repaid.

Recommendations for Reform

Currently, consumers are afforded few protections from proprietary lenders. Proprietary school loans aren’t subject to the federal oversight that regulates credit products originated by most banks and credit unions.

Moreover, some proprietary schools claim that their private student loans aren’t “loans” at all, but rather a form of “consumer financing” – a distinction, NCLC charges, that’s “presumably an effort to evade disclosure requirements such as the federal Truth in Lending Act” as well as a semantic maneuver meant to skirt state banking regulations.

The authors of the NCLC report make a series of recommendations for reforming proprietary school loans. The recommendations advocate for tough federal oversight of both proprietary and private student loans.

Among the NCLC’s favored reforms are requirements that private student loan companies and proprietary lenders adhere to federal truth-in-lending laws; regulations that prohibit proprietary loans from counting toward a school’s required percentage of non-federal revenue; implementing tracking of private and proprietary loan debt and default rates in the National Student Loan Data System, which currently tracks only federal education loans; and centralized oversight to ensure that for-profit schools can’t disguise their true default rates on their private-label student loans.

Other proposed reforms the NCLC supports include modification of federal bankruptcy laws and expansion of federal college loan debt relief programs.

The NCLC argues for a modification of current bankruptcy laws that would allow student borrowers to discharge onerous student loan debts in a bankruptcy petition without having to meet the current, nearly-impossible-to-satisfy “undue hardship” tests. Amidst more relaxed bankruptcy rules and strengthened non-bankruptcy alternatives, the NCLC maintains, fewer borrowers would find themselves hopelessly mired in student loan debt.